Find the Nearest Bike Rack in Tulsa With the Bike Parking Locator

June 1, 2012 in Bicycling, Featured

TULSA – Bike Walk Tulsa has created a bike parking locator map to help Tulsa area bicyclists find bike parking near their final destination.

The map, located at bikewalktulsa.org/tulsa-bike-parking-locator/ and accessible on the site’s sidebar, provides directions to the nearest mapped bike rack when users enter their final destination street address in the search box at the top of the map.

TU Hurricane Bike Shop - West Side bike parking

Bike parking at the University of Tulsa. (photo: Lassiter)

Bike racks are marked for the public, customers, or tenants. Some office buildings downtown have bike racks for building tenants and their employees, so it is important to distinguish which racks are available for anyone to use and which racks are exclusive.

The initial bike parking map contains nearly 60 locations with more than 650 parking spaces for bicycles. Many of the locations, when clicked, are accompanied on the map by a photo to provide a visual cue as to what the bike rack looks like and where it is situated.

Of course, bike parking is extremely elusive and hard to spot, so we know this is not all the bike parking in Tulsa and the surrounding communities. That’s why we need your help.

Bike Walk Tulsa wants to map all the bike parking locations throughout the metro area. Not only Tulsa, but we also want Broken Arrow, Sand Springs, Jenks, Bixby, Owasso, Sapulpa, Catoosa and more. If you see a bike rack somewhere in town, take a picture and email the photo and the location information to us at [email protected]. We’ll get it added to the map.

View Tulsa Bike Parking in a full screen map

Transportation Progress in Tulsa People

June 1, 2012 in Complete Streets

TULSA – Seven out of 10 Tulsans spend more than 45% of their income on transportation and housing combined, according to a study by the Indian Nations Council of Governments (INCOG). If you’re looking for ways to get that number down (who isn’t?), you might be interested in an article in the June edition of Tulsa People on the progression toward more transportation options in our city.

Bus, bike and sidewalk

Buses, bicycles and walking can provide Tulsans the ability to reduce their car dependence and save money. (photo: pedbikeimages.org / Dan Burden)

Written by INCOG’s Transportation Projects Coordinator James Wagner, the essay touches on what’s being done to improve bus service, how the city is working toward Complete Streets, and the long-time-in-coming-hopefully-sometime-soon addition of city-installed bike racks around the city.

Back to that statistic on the portion of income Tulsans spend on transportation and housing, Wagner explains the impact transportation costs have on families in the Tulsa area:

The Department of Housing and Urban Development is using this new measure of housing plus transportation cost to determine the relative economic impact of the “drive till you qualify” phenomenon, in which would-be homeowners ventured farther into the suburbs to find houses they could afford, only to pay higher transportation costs.

HUD noticed that transportation costs often outweighed the cost of similar housing closer to work, resulting in a net loss for families trying to keep their housing costs low.

More transportation options in Tulsa can help families save money. A city focused solely on the automobile — a mode of transportation that, per vehicle, can cost as much as $8,000 – $10,000 per year to own and operate — is not serving the needs of families who are looking for ways to reduce that 45% statistic. Better transportation options will provide Tulsa families the opportunity to choose the right mode of transportation to fit their budget.

Mayor, City Councilor Bike to Work

May 14, 2012 in Bicycling, Featured

Mayor Bartlett and Councilor Steele

Mayor Bartlett (middle) and Councilor Steele (right) ride their bikes to City Hall to kick off Bike to Work Week. (photo: Wagner)

TULSA – Mayor Dewey Bartlett and City Councilor Skip Steele kicked off Bike to Work Week this morning with a bike ride from The Coffee House on Cherry Street to City Hall.

After speaking with media and attendees, the Mayor and First Lady, Councilor Steele and other bicyclists rode their bikes to work, complete with a police bike patrol escort.

Bike rack locations on display

Easels displayed aerial imagery showing the location of bike parking to be installed around Tulsa later this year. (photo: Lassiter)

Bike to Work Week runs from May 14 through May 18 and is part of Tulsa’s celebration of National Bike Month. Monday’s event, hosted by the Indian Nations Council of Governments (INCOG), offered free breakfast pastries, juice and snacks for commuting bicyclists while also providing a glimpse into the location of bicycle racks the city plans to install later this year.

Maps showing the locations of the racks were displayed on easels outside the Coffee House. Several on-street bike corrals will be located on Cherry Street. Bike corrals replace a car parking spot with a series of bike racks that can park 10 bicycles in the space of one car.

Bike to Work Week runs all this week and ends with a celebration on Friday at Joe Momma’s at 112 S. Elgin from 4:30p to 6:30pm. There will be prizes and music and you can enter the Bike Commuter Challenge.

Mayor Bartlett and Councilor Steele

Mayor Bartlett and Councilor Steele are interviewed by Fox 23 at Monday's Bike to Work Week kickoff event. (photo: Lassiter)

Mayor and Councilor on Norfolk

Mayor Bartlett (middle left) and Councilor Steele (middle right) ride on Norfolk Ave south of 11th Street. (photo: Wagner)

Bike to Work

Bike to Work Week kickoff at the Coffee House on Cherry Street, Monday, May 14, 2012. (photo: Lassiter)

Steele ready to go

Councilor Steele and Tulsa Police ready to go. (photo: Lassiter)

Bike to Work Week May 14-18

May 10, 2012 in Bicycling

Mayor Dewey Bartlett

Mayor Dewey Bartlett will kick off Tulsa's Bike-to-Work week Monday, May 14 at the Coffee House on Cherry Street. photo: City of Tulsa

TULSA – May is National Bike Month and Mayor Dewey Bartlett will kick off Tulsa’s Bike to Work week on Monday morning, May 14 at the Coffee House on Cherry Street.

Mayor Bartlett will be joined by First Lady Victoria Bartlett, fresh off last week’s bicycle tour with City Councilors, and city staff to talk about the nearly 100 bicycle racks that are scheduled to be installed around the City of Tulsa later this year.

Bicycle parking is sorely needed in Tulsa, and this first round of bicycle racks will make it easy to ride and park near key destinations in downtown, Cherry Street, Brookside, the Blue Dome and the Brady District.

The new bicycle racks will include Tulsa’s first ever on-street bike parking in the form of bike corrals. A series of inverted-U-shaped racks that allow 10 bicycles to be parked in one on-street car parking space, bike corrals will be a welcome addition to some of Tulsa’s most popular destinations.

Bike Racks in Pilot Program

These bike racks will be installed as part of Tulsa's pilot bike rack program.

In addition to the bike corrals, select bike racks are actually specially commissioned “art racks” in the shape of bison, oil derricks and the city skyline. These racks will be placed near prominent locations such as City Hall, BOK Center, the Central Library and ONEOK Field.

The public is invited to drop by the Bike To Work Week kickoff event at the Coffee House on Cherry Street at 1502 E. 15th Street to ask questions and see the locations of the bike racks.

Free refreshments and breakfast pastries will be provided. The event takes place bright and early from 6 to 8:30am.

Mayor Bartlett is scheduled to appear at 7am. The mayor is even rumored to actually ride his bike to work at City Hall from the event. Let’s see if he follows through.

Bike to Work week will cap off with a celebration on Friday, May 18 at Joe Momma’s Pizza from 4:30 to 6:30pm. There will be music and prizes. Plus, you can sign up for the Bike to Work Commuter Challenge that runs throughout the entire bike-to-work season.

Training Wheels Workshop Series Begins Saturday

April 20, 2012 in Bicycling

TULSA – Next month is National Bike-to-Work month and to get ready, a workshop series called “Training Wheels” gets underway Saturday.

The free workshops are designed for “bike newbies” – people of all ages who are interested in bicycle commuting but have questions or need some encouragement.

On-Street Bike Corral

On-street bike parking is coming to Tulsa. Learn more at "Bike Racks Around Town," part of the Training Wheels workshop series. Photo: www.pedbikeimages.org / Heather Bowden

The first class, “Bicycle Basics”, kicks off at 10am, April 21 at the Tulsa Hub, a bicycle non-profit located at 601 W. Third Street in downtown Tulsa. The Tulsa Hub will explain everything you need to know to get started. They’ll go over the benefits of bicycling, how to select a bike and how to prepare for different kinds of rides. There will even be a short fun ride.

“Gear Up”, the second class of the workshop series, will teach the basics of bicycle maintenance. When you’re out on a ride, you need to know how to change a flat. And much of the maintenance needed for a bicycle can be done cheaply by yourself at home. The staff of Tom’s Bicycles on Cherry Street will cover basic bike tunes that can save you money and keep your bike running smooth. This class starts at 2pm on April 29 at Tom’s Bicycles, 1506 E. 15th Street.

The third class in the workshop series, “Road Rules”, will give you confidence to ride on the street. You may not know it, but bicycles actually belong on the street and not the sidewalk. In fact, you can ride legally on any city street in Tulsa. League Certified Instructor James Wagner will teach the rules of the road and put your fears to rest with essential riding techniques that will keep you safe and having fun. Wagner will even take you out on the road for a spin. This class starts at 10am, May 5 at the Brookside Library located at 1207 E 45th PL.

Nearly 100 bicycle racks are coming to downtown and other areas of Tulsa. If you’ve been frustrated by the lack of bicycle parking in Tulsa, come to the fourth workshop called “Bike Racks Around Town”. From 6 to 8:30 am on Monday, May 14, City of Tulsa officials will be on hand at the Coffee House on Cherry Street to explain where the bike racks will be installed and to answer questions. It’s a great way to kick off Bike-to-Work week. Free refreshments and breakfast pastries will be provided.

To cap off the series, there will be a Bike-to-Work day celebration at Joe Momma’s Pizza form 4:30pm to 6:30pm, Friday May 18. There will be music, beer specials, prize drawings, and you’ll have the chance to sign up for the 2012 Bike-to-Work Commuter Challenge.

Pilot Program to Provide Tulsa’s First-Ever On-Street Bike Parking

January 10, 2012 in Bicycling, Featured

TULSA – Nearly 100 bicycle racks, including bicycle corrals that will provide the city’s first-ever on-street bike parking, are coming to Tulsa as part of a bike rack pilot program, according to city officials.

The bike racks will be installed in various locations in Tulsa’s downtown, Brady District, Blue Dome District, Pearl District, Kendall-Whittier, Brookside and Cherry Street.

“The plans for the racks are about 95% complete,” says Doug Duke, Senior Traffic Engineer for the City of Tulsa. Duke expects a contract to be awarded sometime in March with installation beginning as early as April. All the racks could be in place as early as June.

Bike Racks in Pilot Program

These bike racks will be installed as part of Tulsa's pilot bike rack program. Image: City of Tulsa

Most of the racks being installed will be “Type A’s”, according to Duke. “They are basically inverted U’s with a logo plate attached.”

Each district or neighborhood will have its own logo displayed on the logo plate of the bike rack.

Yet, one of the most exciting aspects to the pilot program is the addition of on-street bicycle corrals to locations downtown and on Cherry Street. The corrals will create the first on-street bike parking in Tulsa in modern history.

Each bicycle corral will replace an on-street car parking space or other vacant street space with five racks that can fit 10 bikes within the space of one car. Placing the racks in the street ensures pedestrians have room to move on the sidewalk.

The on-street corrals are planned to be installed in front of Caz’s Chowhouse in the Brady District, Joe Momma’s in the Blue Dome District, and TCC’s downtown campus. Five on-street corrals are planned for Cherry Street.

“Installing angled parking [on Cherry Street] created opportunities for on-street rack corrals in hatched-out areas where we didn’t want vehicles parking as they would block visibility of traffic,” said Duke. “Not wanting these areas to go to waste, we thought they would be ideal areas for the corrals, as the bikes and racks would not block views of traffic and would put the racks “front and center” to vehicular traffic.”

In bicycle-friendly cities like Portland, businesses are on waiting lists as long as two years to receive bicycle corrals because they know it means they can have more customers park directly in front of their establishment.

In locations where bike racks cannot be placed in the street, the single Type A racks will be installed on the sidewalk in an orientation parallel to the curb to ensure bicycles don’t encroach upon the expected or normal pedestrian path.

In addition to the regular Type A racks, several locations are set to receive upgraded custom “art” racks in the shape of oil derricks, bison and the city skyline.

The custom art rack upgrades are being funded by the Tulsa Beautification Foundation and the Zarrow Families Foundation. The city has been working with these foundations and the Tulsa Hub to develop the designs and the desired locations.

The pilot bike rack project is a joint effort between the Indian Nations Council of Governments (INCOG) and the City of Tulsa, who recognized the need for bike parking as a result of the Trails Master Plan, according to James Wagner, INCOG’s Transportation Projects Coordinator.

“We conducted webinars and provided “best practice” material from the Association of Pedestrian & Bicycle Professionals to the engineers at the City of Tulsa to identify the best designs used around the country and placement of the racks within the sidewalk space,” said Wagner. “Plans are to provide this same opportunity to other communities in the metro area in future years.”

INCOG allocated $50,000 in federal grant funds for the bike rack program. The funds came from the Federal Highway Administration’s Congestion Mitigation & Air Quality (CMAQ) program designed to encourage alternative transportation.

To learn more about bicycle corrals, check out the Streetfilms video below.