Find the Nearest Bike Rack in Tulsa With the Bike Parking Locator

June 1, 2012 in Bicycling, Featured

TULSA – Bike Walk Tulsa has created a bike parking locator map to help Tulsa area bicyclists find bike parking near their final destination.

The map, located at bikewalktulsa.org/tulsa-bike-parking-locator/ and accessible on the site’s sidebar, provides directions to the nearest mapped bike rack when users enter their final destination street address in the search box at the top of the map.

TU Hurricane Bike Shop - West Side bike parking

Bike parking at the University of Tulsa. (photo: Lassiter)

Bike racks are marked for the public, customers, or tenants. Some office buildings downtown have bike racks for building tenants and their employees, so it is important to distinguish which racks are available for anyone to use and which racks are exclusive.

The initial bike parking map contains nearly 60 locations with more than 650 parking spaces for bicycles. Many of the locations, when clicked, are accompanied on the map by a photo to provide a visual cue as to what the bike rack looks like and where it is situated.

Of course, bike parking is extremely elusive and hard to spot, so we know this is not all the bike parking in Tulsa and the surrounding communities. That’s why we need your help.

Bike Walk Tulsa wants to map all the bike parking locations throughout the metro area. Not only Tulsa, but we also want Broken Arrow, Sand Springs, Jenks, Bixby, Owasso, Sapulpa, Catoosa and more. If you see a bike rack somewhere in town, take a picture and email the photo and the location information to us at [email protected]. We’ll get it added to the map.

View Tulsa Bike Parking in a full screen map

Pilot Program to Provide Tulsa’s First-Ever On-Street Bike Parking

January 10, 2012 in Bicycling, Featured

TULSA – Nearly 100 bicycle racks, including bicycle corrals that will provide the city’s first-ever on-street bike parking, are coming to Tulsa as part of a bike rack pilot program, according to city officials.

The bike racks will be installed in various locations in Tulsa’s downtown, Brady District, Blue Dome District, Pearl District, Kendall-Whittier, Brookside and Cherry Street.

“The plans for the racks are about 95% complete,” says Doug Duke, Senior Traffic Engineer for the City of Tulsa. Duke expects a contract to be awarded sometime in March with installation beginning as early as April. All the racks could be in place as early as June.

Bike Racks in Pilot Program

These bike racks will be installed as part of Tulsa's pilot bike rack program. Image: City of Tulsa

Most of the racks being installed will be “Type A’s”, according to Duke. “They are basically inverted U’s with a logo plate attached.”

Each district or neighborhood will have its own logo displayed on the logo plate of the bike rack.

Yet, one of the most exciting aspects to the pilot program is the addition of on-street bicycle corrals to locations downtown and on Cherry Street. The corrals will create the first on-street bike parking in Tulsa in modern history.

Each bicycle corral will replace an on-street car parking space or other vacant street space with five racks that can fit 10 bikes within the space of one car. Placing the racks in the street ensures pedestrians have room to move on the sidewalk.

The on-street corrals are planned to be installed in front of Caz’s Chowhouse in the Brady District, Joe Momma’s in the Blue Dome District, and TCC’s downtown campus. Five on-street corrals are planned for Cherry Street.

“Installing angled parking [on Cherry Street] created opportunities for on-street rack corrals in hatched-out areas where we didn’t want vehicles parking as they would block visibility of traffic,” said Duke. “Not wanting these areas to go to waste, we thought they would be ideal areas for the corrals, as the bikes and racks would not block views of traffic and would put the racks “front and center” to vehicular traffic.”

In bicycle-friendly cities like Portland, businesses are on waiting lists as long as two years to receive bicycle corrals because they know it means they can have more customers park directly in front of their establishment.

In locations where bike racks cannot be placed in the street, the single Type A racks will be installed on the sidewalk in an orientation parallel to the curb to ensure bicycles don’t encroach upon the expected or normal pedestrian path.

In addition to the regular Type A racks, several locations are set to receive upgraded custom “art” racks in the shape of oil derricks, bison and the city skyline.

The custom art rack upgrades are being funded by the Tulsa Beautification Foundation and the Zarrow Families Foundation. The city has been working with these foundations and the Tulsa Hub to develop the designs and the desired locations.

The pilot bike rack project is a joint effort between the Indian Nations Council of Governments (INCOG) and the City of Tulsa, who recognized the need for bike parking as a result of the Trails Master Plan, according to James Wagner, INCOG’s Transportation Projects Coordinator.

“We conducted webinars and provided “best practice” material from the Association of Pedestrian & Bicycle Professionals to the engineers at the City of Tulsa to identify the best designs used around the country and placement of the racks within the sidewalk space,” said Wagner. “Plans are to provide this same opportunity to other communities in the metro area in future years.”

INCOG allocated $50,000 in federal grant funds for the bike rack program. The funds came from the Federal Highway Administration’s Congestion Mitigation & Air Quality (CMAQ) program designed to encourage alternative transportation.

To learn more about bicycle corrals, check out the Streetfilms video below.

Tulsa’s First Planning Director Hired

November 9, 2011 in Bicycling, Walking

TULSA – Dawn Warrick has been hired as Tulsa’s first director of planning and economic development. She’ll be charged with implementing PlaniTulsa, the city’s new comprehensive plan.

You can read more about Warrick in this Tulsa World article.

City of Tulsa logoPlaniTulsaWarrick will be a key player with a significant say in how bicycling and walking are integrated into the transportation system in Tulsa.

Not only will Warrick influence how streets are designed, but she will also be working to modify Tulsa’s zoning code, which is especially important for biking and walking.

For example, bike parking could be mandated for businesses in the same way motor vehicle parking is currently required.

Downtown Banners Spotlight Bicycling

October 21, 2011 in Bicycling

TULSA – Banners are popping up all over lamp posts downtown inviting the public to meet, play, work, live or eat downtown. The banners labeled “Play Downtown” are accompanied by a vector image of a bicyclist zooming along. Posted at the bottom of all the banners is a website link to downtowntulsaok.com.

Banners hanging from lamp posts downtown invite the public to "play downtown" on bicycles.

It is unclear who is behind the banners, but since the banners are placed on the city’s lamp posts, one can surmise that the City of Tulsa is behind the campaign. Although a visit to the  website does not contain any bicycling info per se. At least one picture depicts bicycles “parked” in the Brady District, but there is no mention of anything specifically pertaining how we can play on our bicycles downtown. Perhaps the Find Parking section of the site could highlight the locations of the downtown bike racks that are few and far between and so elusive.

Although not much is mentioned about bicycles on the site, it is encouraging to see this kind of support for bicycling sponsored by the city.