Word on the Street: 4/20/12

April 20, 2012 in Word On The Street by bikewalkadmin

Word on the Street is a compilation of links to active transportation headlines from around the web:

  • QuikTrip Plan Challenges Tulsa’s Development Policies
    At issue is whether the council should approve a development plan – called a Planned Unit Development – for a new store that would replace an existing QuikTrip by closing what is now 10th Street. Advocates for the Pearl District, a neighborhood trying to rebuild itself as a walkable, less car-focused community, oppose the PUD.
  • House Defies Veto Threat, Passes Drill-and-Drive Extension
    This new extension is simply an excuse to start the conference process with the Senate, and all the bells and whistles attached to it are just bargaining chips for the conference table. The bill carries two popular programs — harbor maintenance and the RESTORE Act — and a few unpopular ones — Keystone XL, coal ash, and environmental streamlining  – into the conference room, while the Senate brings program consolidation and a longer timetable.
  • Bike/Ped Survives House’s “Dirty” Transportation Bill Extension
    There had been fear that the Republican leadership would strip out bicycling and walking funds, like Transportation Enhancements. That did not occur. Nor did they gut the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program, another important source of bicycling funds. These cuts, proposed in H.R. 7, had become controversial among Republicans as well as Democrats.
  • Citing Budget Constraints, Portland to Invest More in Biking, Not Driving
    PBOT Director Tom Miller announced that Portland will be pursuing a 10 percent bike mode share goal, an interim step on the city’s way to achieving its 25 percent target by 2030.
  • Detailed Study of DC’s Cycletracks and Their Effect on Bike and Car Traffic
    The two cycletracks increased cycling on their streets enor­mous­ly, and took cycling off the sidewalk. Crashes increased, but not as much as volume, meaning that each individual cyclist became statistically safer. [PDF]