Word on the Street: 1/30/12

January 30, 2012 in Word On The Street by bikewalkadmin

Word on the Street is a compilation of links to active transportation headlines from around the web:

  • New Bike Trail to Connect to Owasso
    The project will involve everything from paving a quarter-mile stretch of trail inside Mohawk Park to designating the two outside lanes of 76th Street in Owasso as bike-share lanes.
  • Street Cred Event to Revive Red Fork District
    Elly Blue’s Dinner & Bikes Tour is scheduled to stop in Tulsa as part of Tulsa Young Professinals’ Street Cred event. Learn more about Street Cred in this report from KJRH.
  • Fundraiser for Family of Pedestrian Killed in Hit-and-Run
    Darrell Abadie was killed by a hit-and-run-driver on January 15, 2012. His body was found in a ditch near 126th Street and Garnett.
  • House Transportation Bill “a March of Horribles”
    The American Energy and Infrastructure Jobs Act looks like a return to 1950s-style transportation policy. It is particularly unkind to transit and bike/ped programs, and to cities in general.
  • Senate Moves Toward Agreement on Transportation Bill
    As House Republicans prepared to release a spending proposal intended to overhaul the federal transportation system, Senate Democrats on Thursday rushed to complete a bipartisan effort to end a stalemate that has undermined transportation programs for almost three years.
  • Virtuous Cycle: 10 Lessons From the World’s Great Biking Cities
    In the Seattle suburb where Christine Grant grew up, the main transportation choice most residents face is what kind of car to buy. She moved to the city after college and, inspired by the “car-lite” lifestyles of several friends, decided to give cycling a try.
  • Anti-Sprawl Doctor to Host PBS Series on Urban Design and Public Health
    “We have built America in a way that is, I believe, is fundamentally unhealthy,” Dr. Jackson says. “It prevents us from walking. It inhibits us from socializing. It removes trees and the things that make our air quality better. We could not have designed an environment that is more difficult for people’s well being at this point.” The “Designing Healthy Communities” series has not yet been scheduled to air on Tulsa’s OETA.
  • Let the Robot Drive: The Autonomous Car of the Future is Here
    “This car can do 75 mph,” Urmson says. “It can track pedestrians and cyclists. It understands traffic lights. It can merge at highway speeds.” In short, after almost a hundred years in which driving has remained essentially unchanged, it has been completely transformed in just the past half decade.
  • 4,114 Stoplights in Los Angeles and the Intricate Network That Tries to Keep Traffic Moving
    Yu is a soft-spoken engineer with great power: He sets the timing for all of L.A.’s stoplights. His department has to take it all in: bikes, trains, big events and, of course, lots and lots of cars.
  • Strong Towns: Shared Space
    The concept of building shared space within the public realm is a radical one here in the United States, where automobiles are not only given priority, but completely dominate most public spaces. With the financial insolvency inherent in our current approach becoming more and more apparent each day, there is a need to study alternatives.